The appropriate response to torching embassies - Jay Maynard

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Sunday, 5 February 2006


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0946 - The appropriate response to torching embassies

The anger in the Islamic world over the publication of a few cartoons of the prophet Mohammed has escalated to an insane degree. Yesterday, it took an even crazier turn, with the embassies of Denmark and Norway in Damascus getting torched, and today the Danish embassy in Beirut got the same treatment.

Under international law, those attacks are nothing less than acts of war.

Unfortunately, the Danish and Norwegians are too cowardly to treat them that way. Instead, they'll go on hand-wringing and apologizing, and thereby encourage the Islamofascists to think they're weak and easily conquered - because they are.

Ever since the Palestinians were shown dancing in the street on 9/11, celebrating the terrorist attacks on American citizens, I have held little hope the Islamofascists can join the international community. It's stuff like this that makes me think the only solution is to make lots of radioactive glass.

current mood: [mood icon] pissed off
current music: The Who - You Better You Bet

(10 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments:


[User Picture]
From:jugularjaguar
Date: - 0000

Well

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From their point of view they should not based an entire society or punish others for the views of one person, the cartoonist. Now in the reverse we should not judge their society from the actions of a few extremists. Though after hearing about their actions I really have to wonder about Mohommend. Is this a prophet that spoke of forgiveness? I bet he was. Is the Islam religion a loving religion? I bet it is. though those who say they practice it seem to need a lot more practicing.
[User Picture]
From:jmaynard
Date: - 0000

Re: Well

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The problem is that they show no inclination to rein in the extremists whatsoever. At some point, the extremists are the responsibility of their country. If Syria doesn't shut them down, then they accept responsibility for their actions.
[User Picture]
From:jugularjaguar
Date: - 0000

Re: Well

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I agree with that. Someone in authority should say something and try to rein them in. I don't see it all. I wonder how the Islam followers in the US are reacting to this.
[User Picture]
From:howardtayler
Date: - 0000
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The problem with declaring war is that we don't have anybody to declare against. The muslim states are decrying the cartoons, but are not themselves (publicly) advocating violence.

I like Havarti more than radioactive glass.
[User Picture]
From:jmaynard
Date: - 0000
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Sure we do. The host country is responsible to see that embassies are protected, under international law. We would have been right ti respond to the takeover of the embassy in Tehran with military force in 1979; that we didn't was because the president at the time was too gutless to defend American soil.

If Syria can't keep its people from burning embassies, they can and should be held responsible.
[User Picture]
From:foolscap001
Date: - 0000
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The depressing thing is that a few centuries ago, the Islamic world was a center of philosphy, science, and math. (All those terms in science and math that start with "al-" are Arabic in origin. "Algorithm" too.)

I have to wonder what it is that took that culture down to its current depths.
[User Picture]
From:bronxelf_ag001
Date: - 0000
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I have discovered that religion, when taken to extreme (any religion-- Im equal opportunity) can take down any culture, because it is, in and of itself, counter to change (which is an inevetable factor of culture.)

[User Picture]
From:korgmeister
Date: - 0000
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My theory is that back then, the Sufis were in charge.

I've never heard of Sufi Muslims causing trouble, it's the others who seem to have a hard-on for breaking things and killing people.

Unfortunately, as Sufism declined, so did the fortunes of Dar Al Islam.

(FYI: Am not Sufi, am Christian. Just sort of relaying what little I know about this sort of thing.)
From:krelmoon
Date: - 0000

Some cultures are a little behind.

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At some point in the next 25 years our culture will infect theirs and things will change. Confucius says " If you wait by the river long enough the body of your enemy will float past". This is already happening in many places in the middle east. Just be patient, even the destruction of embassies is movement towards change for the better. Non-extremists see this happening on the news and condemn it. The news in the middle east is so controlled, so slanted towards the extremist view that many people know not to trust it and read between the lines. Iran's government may be adversarial at the moment but if nearly everyone under 30 listens to western music watches western movies and disagrees with the way the government is currently run how long will that government last? It's only about 30 or so years old now. Angry students attacked the U.S. Embassy in 1975 and took hostages after deposing the oppressive Shaw of Iran. Who says that can't happen again with a more positive governmental result? Time heals all wounds and I believe the Middle east will transform.
[User Picture]
From:jmaynard
Date: - 0000

Re: Some cultures are a little behind.

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Khrushchev thought the same thing. His famous "We will bury you" speech was meant to imply that Communism would outlast the West. He wasn't exactly correct about that.

Similarly, we can't assume that the Islamofascist movement won't die off. Who knows? It might get even stronger with time.

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